Bioprocesses for the removal of volatile pollutants: present state of knowledge and future perspectives

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Different alternatives exist for the removal of odours and other volatile compounds from waste gases. On one side, non-biological processes can be used (mainly absorption, adsorption, and oxidation processes)

C. Kennes, H.N. Abubackar y M.C. Veiga
 La Coruña (UDC) University, Campus da Zapateira – Ingeniería Química, Rua da Fraga 10, E – 15008 – La Coruña, España. Tel.: 34-981-167000; Fax.: 34-981-167065; Kennes_at_ udc.es

Keywords: Bioreactor, biofilter, bioscrubber, trickling filter, odours, air diffusion bioreactor.

sesion4 kennes02Abstract

Different alternatives exist for the removal of odours and other volatile compounds from waste gases. On one side, non-biological processes can be used (mainly absorption, adsorption, and oxidation processes) and, on the other side, bioprocesses can be used.

The present study focuses on biological processes and presents the most important characteristics of the main technologies available on the market for the treatment of odours and the removal of volatiles pollutants from waste gases.

Alternative selection in odour treatment technologies: sustainability and economical sensitivity

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Selection criteria for odour abatement technologies have been traditionally economic and based on the flow rate to be treated, odour concentration (or of a certain surrogate such as H2S) and removal efficiency. However, nowadays social and environmental aspects are starting to gain importance

J. M. Estrada1, B. Kraakman2,3, G. Quijano1, R. Lebrero1, R. Muñoz1
1 Valladolid University, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environment Technology
2 CH2M HILL Australia
3 Delft University of Technology, Department of Biotechnology

Keywords: adsorption, biofiltration, chemical scrubber, environmental impact, odour abatement, operating costs.

 

sesion4 estrada01Abstract

Selection criteria for odour abatement technologies have been traditionally economic and based on the flow rate to be treated, odour concentration (or of a certain surrogate such as H2S) and removal efficiency. However, nowadays social and environmental aspects are starting to gain importance.

Odour abatement systems are designed to operate over long periods of time (20-30 years) and under dynamic scenarios and conditions. Therefore, an economic analysis of sensitivity of the operating costs towards different design and operational parameters is crucial.

This study summarizes the results from comparative sustainability analyses of the most applied technologies in the field of odour abatement: activated carbon adsorption, activated sludge diffusion, biofiltration, biotrickling filters, chemical scrubbers and hybrid systems (biotrickling filter + adsorption). Based on commodity prices and real market data provided by different manufacturers, the analysis revealed that technologies with low investment costs present high operating costs and are mainly physical/chemical technologies. Biological alternatives show lower operating costs and environmental impacts.

In terms of economic sensitivity, biological technologies show lower sensitivity towards design and operating parameters than their physical-chemical counterparts. The main drawback of physical-chemical technologies is their high sensitivity towards variations in the H2S concentration of odorous emissions due to their high chemicals and adsorption agents requirements. In economic and environmental terms, activated sludge diffusion and biotrickling filters stand out as the most promising technologies for a near future.

 

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Why is necessary to validate results of an odour modelling assessment

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In Chile odour issues are becoming critical. The community is putting pressure on authorities and industry is being forced to take actions in order to minimize odour nuisances. There are approaches that allow delivering "reliable" results<

E. Contreras y V. Zorich M.

Ecometrika, Américo Vespucio 2296, Conchalí, Santiago, Chile. www.ecometrika.com, , .

Keywords: Belgian plume method, odour exposure impact assessment, odour control master plan.

contreras imagen engAbstract

In Chile odour issues are becoming critical. The community is putting pressure on authorities and industry is being forced to take actions in order to minimize odour nuisances. There are approaches that allow delivering "reliable" results such as odour dispersion modelling, yet the question remains on how reliable the result of modelling can be. Are the results of modelling a true representation of the real odour impact and –most importantly– nuisances? In order to check the results obtained from a dispersion model, and validate how representative they are, it is essential and necessary to verify these. In this paper two case studies are presented that illustrate how methodologies by panel field can validate parallel modelling approaches. In both case, validation process was a valuable tool for detecting errors and obtaining reliable results. We conclude that modelling results must be validated by another methodology or they can be clearly misleading.

 

 

 

 

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